#T5W: Future Classics

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This topic is incredibly difficult for someone like me, which is to say an overly analytical type. When I consider what constitutes a genuine classic, we’re talking about a book that will be read a hundred years from now. I don’t know if anyone can predict that. We can list the books that we think are important and worthy, but we can’t say who will be remembered and who forgotten.

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Vampiric Reads: My TBR (Part 2)

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Welcome to part two of my vampire TBR. If you missed it, check out part one. There are plenty more I intend to get to in the hopes of expanding my vampire library. Let’s get going.

Vivia by Tanith Lee. As with all of Lee’s vampire stories, this sounds gorgeous and different from the bloodsuckers we’re used to. Funny story about this one. I actually received it from a friend who is utterly terrified of vampires. She started reading it not knowing it was about that, then immediately chucked it in my direction. I still haven’t read it, but I need to prioritize it.

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#T5W: Favorite Angsty Romances

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This week’s topic is angsty romances, meaning relationships in books that have a lot of ups and downs or maybe even a tragic end. I think every reader has a list of books that ripped out their heart and stomped on it in this regard, and here are mine.

5. Louis/Lestat from The Vampire Chronicles by Anne Rice. No, I haven’t read all these books, but Interview with the Vampire is enough to see that Louis and Lestat lived like a married couple for quite a while. And then had a sudden and awful falling out. The book is more subtext than explicit, but this is definitely a romance between two people with clashing life philosophies. Which means sometimes love isn’t enough in that case. Hilariously, Louis often makes Lestat sound like a childish bully, but Lestat views Louis as this giant crybaby. Despite their differences, you can’t help but crave a proper reunion where they bury the hatchet. Though not in each other’s necks.

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Vampiric Reads: My TBR (Part 1)

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Welcome to the first of two posts that talk about the vampire reads I’m hoping to get to. Obviously I can’t review these yet, but I can tell you why they look interesting to me. I’ll also be linking these so you can look at the summaries. So let’s get started.

Certain Dark Things by Silvia Moreno-Garcia. Aztec vampires? Yes, please. That’s exactly the kind of thing this sub-genre needs. A different set of folklore to pull from to breathe new life into an old monster. It sounds like it’s full of culture and history that will be really engaging even without vampires, so this one’s on the wishlist.

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#T5W: Books I Felt Betrayed By

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The wording of this week’s topic feels a little overly personal. Betrayal is something that has intent behind it, and, no, I don’t believe that any author has ever written a book with the thought of hurting me in mind. Instead I’m going to talk about some books that I feel I should have loved and didn’t. I mean, that does result in sore feelings, so I feel it counts.

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Vampiric Reads: Where To Continue

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If this is the first time you’re seeing this, go check out the previous post about where to start with vampire fiction. This is for the people who have already read the classics and the popular books. Now we get into the reads that are off the beaten path.

The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis. This might be considered spoilers in a way. For most of the book, the stories in this collection seem normal. They’re vaguely connected. They take place in the same kind of world Ellis always writes about: the world of the disaffected rich kid. It’s as wonderful as all his other writing, but toward the end, it suddenly veers into the truly unexpected. There are vampires. Not metaphorical ones but literal ones. I don’t want to say much more than that. I’m hoping this will be like a carrot on a string that will convince people to read this fantastic book. Also, I say they’re not metaphorical, but in a way, they are. In Ellis’s universe peopled by the selfish elite, vampires fit right in.

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#T5W: Favorite SFF Books

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For the uninitiated, SFF stands for Science Fiction/Fantasy. This is a wonderful topic, and hopefully I have some good recommendations for you here based on my favorites.

5. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch by Philip K. Dick. That’s a mouthful, I know. It’s also my favorite of PKD’s work. That’s saying something since I find all of his work is high quality and worth reading. It deals in a lot of the themes he generally covers. In this case, we’re especially talking about drugs and their effects and the question of what is reality. It’s classic SF, but it was far ahead of its time. It still holds up today and probably beyond. It’s also the only standalone on this list, which means it really packs a punch in a small space.

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Vampiric Reads: Where to Start

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I love vampires. That’s become a taboo thing to admit, with vampires now considered more romantic figures than frightening ones. But it’s true, and I can’t deny it. I love vampires of all kinds. The monster, the seducer, and all the very weird in-betweens. The vampire is one of our most richly varied creatures, from folklore to pop culture. There have been so many twists on the idea, that I obviously feel it bears talking about.

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Reading Wrap-Up: February 2017

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I read so much this month. Let’s not delay then and get right into it.

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh. (My Rating: 5/5) I was already a fan of Brosh from her blog. In fact, if you’re curious, I suggest having a look at that first to see if you like the style. It’s a mixed media type of storytelling, with simple images and text, like illustrated stories. And it’s hilarious. And sometimes surprisingly moving. While there are some previous blog posts of hers collected in this volume, there are also lots of new installments that can only be found here. I highly recommend this as a quick and amusing read that also packs a punch in spots, especially when she gets very honest and raw about her battle with depression.

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